Our grassroots campaign successfully passed legislation providing $2 billion a year in additional funding for our public schools — and a brighter future for our students.

We are now fighting to restore $600 million in state funding for our community colleges, state universities and UMass.

Students, parents educators, and community leaders know there’s an urgent public education funding crisis facing Massachusetts.

That’s why we are calling on our lawmakers to increase funding for our state’s public colleges and universities.

PreK-12 Funding

The Student Opportunity Act provides a major infusion of new funding to Massachusetts public schools.

Low-income students, students of color and English learners, who have been left behind by an outdated system, are the primary beneficiaries of the new law.

Higher Ed Funding

Funding for public higher education in MA has been cut by 31 percent since 2001, shifting the cost of education onto students and families.

The Cherish Act would increase state per student funding for public higher education back to 2001 levels over five years, an increase of $600 million. It would also freeze tuition in fees every year that state funding targets are met.

Take Action

Urge your legislators to reverse years of underfunding of our public colleges and universities.

PreK-12 Funding

The Commonwealth’s public school funding formula is outdated. State Chapter 70 education aid fails to provide local communities with the resources they need to provide their students with the education to which they are entitled. Districts serving low-income students are especially short-changed.

The Student Opportunity Act would change the funding formula to more accurately reflect the true cost of public education, with most of the new funding going to districts with the greatest needs.

Higher Ed Funding

Funding for public higher education in MA has been cut by 31% since 2001, shifting the cost of education onto students and families.

The Cherish Act would address the gap created by underfunding and introduce preventative measures to ensure a strong public higher education system.

latest news

  • As a public school parent, I regularly have to donate money so my daughter’s classroom can have basic supplies like tissues and markers. She’s never been to the library at her middle school because there's no money for a librarian.

    Ricardo Rosa Parent in New Bedford and Professor at UMass Dartmouth
  • For decades, Massachusetts has failed to address the persistent education inequality that often exists between students in one community and those in the city or town right next door. I’ve taught in both Worcester and Weston, and I’ve seen firsthand the difference between a well-funded school district and one that doesn’t receive adequate funding.

    Zena Link Public School Teacher
  • Education is the most precious resource in a democracy. Together we can take back our schools and colleges.

    Merrie Najimy President, Massachusetts Teachers Association
  • As a public school parent, I regularly have to donate money so my daughter’s classroom can have basic supplies like tissues and markers. She’s never been to the library at her middle school because there's no money for a librarian.

    Ricardo Rosa Parent in New Bedford and Professor at UMass Dartmouth
  • For decades, Massachusetts has failed to address the persistent education inequality that often exists between students in one community and those in the city or town right next door. I’ve taught in both Worcester and Weston, and I’ve seen firsthand the difference between a well-funded school district and one that doesn’t receive adequate funding.

    Zena Link Public School Teacher
  • Education is the most precious resource in a democracy. Together we can take back our schools and colleges.

    Merrie Najimy President, Massachusetts Teachers Association
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WHO’S SIGNED ON?

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WHO’S SIGNED ON?

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